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First World War art subject of talk in Diss

PUBLISHED: 12:03 24 November 2018

The Menin Road (1919) by Paul Nash, amongst the First World War artists that will be subject of talk in Diss. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

The Menin Road (1919) by Paul Nash, amongst the First World War artists that will be subject of talk in Diss. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

Archant

Art from the First World War will be the fascinating and moving subject of a special talk in Diss by local art historian Tania Harrington.

Tania Harrington will be giving a talk entitled War Power: The Art of World War One. Picture: Diss Corn HallTania Harrington will be giving a talk entitled War Power: The Art of World War One. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

The talk at Diss Corn Hall on November 27 will be looking at British art and artists during the Great War and will include Paul Nash, Percy Wyndham Lewis, William Orpen and John Singer Sargent, among others.

The First World was a completely new kind of mechanised warfare. At the start of the conflict, the accepted style of war painting was a legacy from Victorian times: heroic battle scenes and reassuring patriotic messages.

What followed was a revolution in art, as artists struggled to depict the reality of life at the front.

La Mitrailleuse (1915) by CWR Nevinson, amongst the First World War artists that will be subject of talk in Diss. Picture: Diss Corn HallLa Mitrailleuse (1915) by CWR Nevinson, amongst the First World War artists that will be subject of talk in Diss. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

And whether revered or ridiculed at the time, many of these paintings can help us remember World War One today.

Tania Harrington is an enthusiastic art lover with an ambition to convey the deeper undercurrents of the art historical narrative, seeing the connections between works and the emotional and cultural impetus behind them.

Her talk, titled War Power: The Art of World War One, will be richly illustrated with about 50 examples and will examine biography, socio-political and cultural factors as well as artistic style. It also looks at the deep challenge to the pre-War avant-garde.

She said: “It is indeed potentially a depressing and grim theme but it is actually fascinating to see the variety and heart-feltness of the responses to such a tragic event and ultimately gives us hope that such powerful and humanitarian works were created.”

• War Power: The Art of World War One is at Diss Corn Hall on November 27, 10.30am, £8, £5 under-18s, 01379 652241, disscornhall.co.uk

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