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Reader’s responses: Your first memories of Diss

PUBLISHED: 13:11 27 September 2018 | UPDATED: 09:12 01 October 2018

A magnificent photograph of the Robert Burns approaching the Newton Greenways crossing between Flordon and Swainsthorpe on March 14 1953. Picture: R Harrison

A magnificent photograph of the Robert Burns approaching the Newton Greenways crossing between Flordon and Swainsthorpe on March 14 1953. Picture: R Harrison

R Harrison

We asked the members on our Enjoy Diss More Facebook page what some of their earliest memories of Diss are.

Puppet show at Diss Infant School, April 1966. Picture: Archant LibraryPuppet show at Diss Infant School, April 1966. Picture: Archant Library

With a host of comments and people sharing their memories and favourite parts of Diss here are just a few of them.

Mike Bardwell said: “Walking to Junior School, yes, walking, no Chelsea tractors then, in the snow and going past Blomefield Road and Clare House which was a huge building site.”

Janice Garman said: “I came to Bressingham five years ago and on one sunny day in my first year up here, I met my daughter, son in law and my two beautiful granddaughters who were four and two, in Bressingham Steam and Gardens and we had a picnic in their lovely gardens there.”

The Mere is a centre point of the town but many moons ago it was known to freeze over. Philip Clarke remembers.

Picture: Richard Adderson collectionPicture: Richard Adderson collection

Philip Clarke said: “I can remember walking on the ice on the Mere in 1963.

Teresa Parslow said: “Was born in Diss. My first memory was being in our garden when we lived in the house next to Chapmans bakers.

“It was where the library is now and I was about three-years-old.”

For some the train station is a fond memory with it being one of the most popular ways to visit Diss.

Brigitte Hewson said: “The railway station is my first thought, remembering the times we went as a family to take family to get the train back to barracks wherever they were stationed.

“Uncle Gordon and Uncle Rennie came to mind and the chip cart, a treat on a Saturday.”

Mr Bardwell added: “I also remember standing in Skelton Road looking at the Railway station.”

Rachel Allen said: “Being rescued, aged around four, by my uncle, from the top of the huge slide which was in the park in the 60s.”

Post any other of your memories over on our Facebook page.

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