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Quaker Wood volunteers help make sure its looking its best for autumn

PUBLISHED: 17:01 03 October 2018 | UPDATED: 17:30 03 October 2018

Volunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Volunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Archant Norfolk Photographic © 2016

People are being encouraged to enjoy the last warm days of the year, enjoy autumn colours and join in the first autumn working party at a Diss community wood.

Volunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya DuncanVolunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya Duncan

The regular working party at Quaker Wood is inviting families and people wanted to get out in the fresh air and enjoy nature on our doorstep to join them.

The regular first Saturday of each month working party will on October 6 have a special autumn feel.

Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya DuncanQuaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya Duncan

There are a number of autumn cutting and clearing tasks to do so make sure you take a rake, fork, saw or loppers and all hands will usefully employed.

As usual, Rita will be providing mid morning refreshments for those who pop along to admire the emerging autumn tints and see what has changed in the last few weeks.

Volunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya DuncanVolunteers can help by taking part in an autumn clear up at Quaker Wood in Diss. Picture: Sonya Duncan

The event runs from 9.30am to 1pm and all are welcome.

Quaker Wood, off Factory Lane, became a community woodland in 2010 and was opened by renowned naturalist and writer Richard Mabey.

The five and a half acre site, which was once used as an agricultural meadow, was bought by the Woodland Group in 2008.

The group had secured £35,000 from a nearby developer to buy the land from the Society of Friends, known as The Quakers, who is the wood is named after.

Dozens of volunteers spent 18 months clearing the pretty patch and planting hundreds of sapling trees, which will one day grow into an established wood.

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