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What to do if you see abandoned ducklings in Diss

PUBLISHED: 15:07 08 May 2018 | UPDATED: 15:07 08 May 2018

Mallard ducklings wandering around the garden. Picture: Gary Dockerill

Mallard ducklings wandering around the garden. Picture: Gary Dockerill

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With the warm weather has come prime breeding season for Diss’s ducks and the inevitable arrival of fluffy ducklings.

Diss man Ali McGuinness rescued 12 ducklings from a drain in Diss. Photo: Cassie Jayne PotterDiss man Ali McGuinness rescued 12 ducklings from a drain in Diss. Photo: Cassie Jayne Potter

It is not an uncommon site to see the mother ducks pootling along Mere Street or the park with their procession of young trailing behind.

However, what are you supposed to do if you come across a duckling which has separated from the brace?

Ducklings are frequently spotted around Diss apparently unsupervised however the experts say this is not necessarily a cause for concern.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has issued advice on how to help baby birds if you see them alone.

Diss resident Claire McGuinness successfully reunited these lost ducklings with their mother. Photo: Claire McGuinnessDiss resident Claire McGuinness successfully reunited these lost ducklings with their mother. Photo: Claire McGuinness

On their website they advise: “Seeing ducklings and other young birds on their own is perfectly normal, so there’s no need to be worried.

“However tempting, interfereing with a young bird like this will do more harm than good as fledglings are extremely unlikely to be abandoned by their parents.

“Just because you cannot see the adult doesn’t mean they are not there.”

The removal of a baby bird from the wild should only be done as a last resort, such as if it is injured or has definitely been abandoned or orphaned.

Some residents of Diss have taken to social media to express concern over the ducklings being “literally sitting ducks” and at risk of being attacked by a cat or similar.

The RSPB advise that if the bird is in danger then it makes sense to move it a short distance to a safer place.

Additionally: “If you have cats make sure you keep them indoors until the fledglings are airborne.

“In any conflict of interest between wild animals and domestic pets, it is always the domestic pet which must give way.”

Have you seen the ducklings around Diss? Post your photos on the Enjoy Diss More Facebook page and have the chance to be featured on our website.

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